Education and Science

Iceland has a well-read population and publishes an unusually high number of books per capita, second only to the UK. Iceland´s education system is comparable with that of other Nordic countries, with its national curriculum starting as early as age 2. The Icelandic education system is based around the ethos of equity and equal opportunities for all, irrespective of gender, parental income, residence, religion, disabilities, and background.

Icelandic universities provide excellent opportunities for studies in various fields, for example geology, renewable energy, the health sciences and the humanities.

Iceland has seven higher education institutions, the largest of which is the University of Iceland, founded in 1911. Icelandic universities provide excellent opportunities for studies in various fields, for example geology, renewable energy, the health sciences and the humanities. Iceland has the largest proportion of university students over 30 years old, when compared to other European countries, and a third of students at Icelandic Universities are parents, triple that of the European average. A third of the Icelandic population has completed a tertiary degree and the employment rate for people with a higher education qualification is 94% compared to 84% in Europe. Icelandic scientists are active in international collaborations; with half the scientific publications having international co-authors. The citation impact measure of scientific quality of publications from scientists at Icelandic institutions is above the OECD average. 

Contact for further information and requests for interviews:
Kristrún Heiða Hauksdóttir, Head of Information for Iceland‘s Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, kristrun.heida.hauksdottir@mrn.is


 

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